Animal Info - Fijian Monkey-faced Bat

(Other Names: Monkey Bat)

Pteralopex acrodonta

Status: Critically Endangered


Contents

1. Profile (Picture)
2. Tidbits
3. Status and Trends (IUCN Status, Countries Where Currently Found, History of Distribution, Threats and Reasons for Decline)
4. Data on Biology and Ecology (Size, Habitat, Diet, Social Organization)
5. References


Profile

Pictures: Fijian Monkey-faced Bat #1 (36 Kb JPEG) (Wildlife Images); Fijian Monkey-faced Bat #2 (44 Kb JPEG) (Univ Calif - Davis - ICE)

The head and body length of the genus Pteralopex is 255 - 280 mm (10 - 11"). The Fijian monkey-faced bat reportedly roosts in fern clumps growing 6 - 10 m (20 - 33') from the ground on trunks of the larger trees in open, tall forest. Two specimens were captured in high mountain cloud forest. A comparison of the teeth and jaw structure of the genus Pteralopex with those of other fruit bats suggests that the diet of Pteralopex species may consist of fruits and other plant material that is tougher than typical for other fruit bats. The Fijian monkey-faced bat has been reported to roost in pairs.

The Fijian monkey-faced bat is known only from a single mountain on Taveuni Island in Fiji. Although there is little information on its status, proposals for development involving forest clearance in the uplands of Taveuni may prove to be a threat.


Tidbits

*** The Fijian monkey-faced bat is known from only 5 specimens.


Status and Trends

IUCN Status:

Countries Where the Fijian Monkey-faced Bat Is Currently Found:

2004: Occurs in Fiji (IUCN 2004).

History of Distribution:

The Fijian monkey-faced bat is known only from a single mountain on Taveuni Island in Fiji.

Threats and Reasons for Decline:

Although there is little information on the status of the Fijian monkey-faced bat, proposals for development involving forest clearance in the uplands of Taveuni may prove to be a threat.


Data on Biology and Ecology

Size:

The head and body length of the genus Pteralopex is 162 - 275 mm (6.4 - 11").

Habitat:

The Fijian monkey-faced bat reportedly roosts in fern clumps growing 6 - 10 m (20 - 33') from the ground on trunks of the larger trees in open, tall forest (Nowak 1999). Two specimens were captured in high mountain cloud forest.

The Fijian monkey-faced bat is one of the species that live in the Polynesia and Micronesia Biodiversity Hotspot (Cons. Intl. 2005).  

Diet:

This species of the genus Pteralopex is likely to have a diet similar to the other species of the genus, mainly based on nuts.

Social Organization:

The Fijian monkey-faced bat has been reported to roost in pairs.


References

Cons. Intl. 2005, IUCN 1994, IUCN 1996, IUCN 2000, IUCN 2003a, IUCN 2004, Mickleburgh 1992, Nowak 1999, Nowak & Paradiso 1983, Univ Calif - Davis - ICE, Wildlife Images


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Last modified: March 5, 2005;

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