Animal Info - Cusp-toothed Fruit Bat

(Other Names: Chao Rondo, Cusp-toothed Flying Fox, Guadalcanal Monkey-faced Bat)

Pteralopex atrata

Status: Critically Endangered


Contents

1. Profile
2. Tidbits
3. Status and Trends (IUCN Status, Countries Where Currently Found, History of Distribution, Threats and Reasons for Decline)
4. Data on Biology and Ecology (Size, Habitat, Gestation Period, Early Development, Diet)
5. References


Profile

The head and body length of bats in the genus Pteralopex is 162 - 275 mm (6.4 - 11"). As a rule the genus Pteralopex is confined to primary forest. The cusp-toothed fruit bat probably has a similar diet to the other species of the genus, which is predominantly based on nuts. This is based on the generic feature of specialist dentition. As a rule the genus is confined to primary forest.

The cusp-toothed fruit bat occurs on Guadalcanal and Santa Ysabel Islands in the Solomon Islands. It apparently has declined sharply but was sighted in 1991. All known species the genus Pteralopex are threatened by current logging practices. The cusp-toothed fruit bat on Guadalcanal faces extirpation due to the forecast of all forest below 800 m (2600') being lost within the next decade.


Tidbits

*** "Although there is a complete absence of ecological information on the role of fruit bats in the ecosystem of these islands, it is possible that, as in other Pacific islands, a third of the canopy tree species rely on flying foxes for pollination or seed dispersal; and they provide potential economic benefits as pollinators of cash crops." (Bowen-Jones et al. 1997)


Status and Trends

IUCN Status:

  • 1994: Endangered
  • 1996 - 2004: Critically Endangered (Criteria: A1c) (Population Trend: Decreasing) (IUCN 2004)

Countries Where the Cusp-toothed Fruit Bat Is Currently Found:

2004: Occurs in Solomon Islands. (IUCN 2004)

History of Distribution:

The cusp-toothed fruit bat occurs on Guadalcanal and Santa Ysabel Islands in the Solomon Islands. It apparently has declined sharply but was sighted in 1991 (Nowak 1999).

Threats and Reasons for Decline:

All known species the genus Pteralopex are threatened by current logging practices. The cusp-toothed fruit bat on Guadalcanal faces extirpation due to the forecast of all forest below 800 m (2600') being lost within the next decade (Bowen-Jones et al. 1997).


Data on Biology and Ecology

Size:

The head and body length of bats in the genus Pteralopex is 162 - 275 mm (6.4 - 11").

Habitat:

As a rule the genus Pteralopex is confined to primary forest (Bowen-Jones et al. 1997).

The cusp-toothed fruit bat lives in the East Melanesian Islands Biodiversity Hotspot (Cons. Intl. 2005).

Gestation Period:

The gestation period of flying foxes is 4 - 5 months (Bonaccorso 1998). 

Early Development:

The young of flying foxes become independent at 3 - 6 months (Bonaccorso 1998).

Diet:

The cusp-toothed fruit bat probably has a similar diet to the other species of the genus, which is predominantly based on nuts. This is based on the generic feature of specialist dentition. As a rule the genus is confined to primary forest. (Bowen-Jones et al. 1997)


References

Bonaccorso 1998Bowen-Jones et al. 1997, Cons. Intl. 2005, IUCN 1994, IUCN 1996, IUCN 2000, IUCN 2003a, IUCN 2004, Mickleburgh 1992, Nowak 1999, Nowak & Paradiso 1983


Top of Page | Search This Site

Home | Rarest Mammals | Species Index | Species Groups Index | Country Index | Links


Last modified: March 5, 2005;

1999 - 2014 Animal Info. Endangered animals of the world. SJ Contact Us.